noonki kaahkiihkwe tikawi ceeliteeki (85) aahsanteeki ahsenisiipionki. meemeekwa-hka kati ciinkwia pyaaci piitilaanwi noonki peehkonteeki.

noonki peehkonteeki kiinte napale waawiyiisita (keešaakosita).

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
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noonki kaahkiihkwe tikawi ceeliteeki (85) aahsanteeki ahsenisiipionki. ceeliteeki (92) aahsanteeki noošonke siipionki. pahsaahkaahkanka noonki kaahkiihkwe!

noonki peehkonteeki myaalisiwa (peemineeta).

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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noonki kaahkiihkwe tikawi ceeliteeki (86) aahsanteeki ahsenisiipionki.

noonki peehkonteeki naawi napale neepiki (peemineeta).

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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noonki kaahkiihkwe tikawi neepanki (51) aalahkwahki eewanki šeepilaanki ahsenisiipionki.

noonki peehkonteeki naawi waawiyiistia wiihkoowia kiilhswa (keešaakosita). kapootwe kati ansiwatooko myaamia miincipi! wiihkoowia ilweeci “ansiwašikoko… ansiwašikoko.”

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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kokomo neehi eeweemaacihi
A Brief History of Kokomo and His Family
By John Bickers and George Ironstrack

In the spring of 1864, in the town of Wabash, Indiana, a young Myaamia (Miami Indian) man named Pimweeyotamwa enlisted in the United States Army to serve in the 101st Infantry Regiment fighting in the United States Civil War. Pimweeyotamwa, also known as Eli Goodboy, served with the 101st until June of 1865.[1] As a member of the 101st., Pimweeyotamwa would have likely participated in many key events in the Civil War, including the Atlanta Campaign and Sherman’s March to the Sea.[2] Pimweeyotamwa likely had much in common with his fellow soldiers in Company K. Many of them came from rural backgrounds and had grown up farming, hunting, and fishing the river valleys of northern Indiana. But Pimweeyotamwa was unique among his particular “band of brothers,” in that his Myaamia family had ties to the northern Wabash River Valley that stretched back to long before the state of Indiana existed. In a strange twist of fate, Pimweeyotamwa was fighting to preserve the Union of a country that had diminished his people’s homelands and forcibly removed hundreds of Myaamia people west of the Mississippi.

Current residents of Howard County County, Indiana should also consider Pimweeyotamwa unique among his fellow soldiers because he was the grandson of the man often called Kokomo, the namesake of the county seat. Since the incorporation of the town of Kokomo in 1865, many interesting stories and myths have circulated about the man people call “Chief Kokomo,” yet few of these stories have addressed his family in any detail.

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