noonki kaahkiihkwe peetilaanki tikawi ceeliteeki (67).

peetilaanki2

noonki peehkonteeki saakiwa wiihkoowia kiilhswa (keešaakosita). kapootwe kati ansiwaatooyankwi miincipi.

saakiwa2

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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wiihkoowia kiilhswa is the forth lunar month of the Myaamia lunar calendar.  Like the other months named for birds, wiihkoowia kiilhswa is associated with the process of transition from pipoonwi (winter) into niipinwi (summer).  The month is named for wiihkoowia (Eastern Whip-poor-will – Antrostomus vociferus).

Caprimulgus_vociferusAAP065B

Around this time of year, Whip-poor-wills return from their winter nesting grounds around the Gulf of Mexico.  Historically, Whip-poor-wills nested throughout our traditional homelands along the Wabash River Valley.  Because these night birds nest on the ground, drastic changes in forest habitat have decreased populations of wiihkoowia in central Indiana and in eastern Missouri near the contemporary home of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma..  The call of wiihkooowia is distinctive and was used to mark the beginning of planting time for Myaamia miincipi (Miami corn).  Corn that is planted during wiihkoowia kiilhswa is usually in the green corn stage by kiišiinkwia kiilhswa (Green Corn Moon).

*image from wikimedia commons here

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noonki kaahkiihkwe peehki aalhkwahki tikawi ceeliteeki (69). noonki kaahkiihkwe meemeekwa-hka piitilanwi maleewaalahkwatwi.

aalhkwahki2

noonki peehkonteeki naawi napale neepiki (peemineeta).

naawi napale neepiki

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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noonki kaahkiihkwe peetilaanki aalhkwahki tikawi ceeliteeki (58).

peetilaanki2

noonki peehkonteeki kiinte saakiwa cecaahkwa kiilhswa (keešaakosita).

waakhšinka

taaniši kiišikahki niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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MC Crane - Hi Resolution-comp

Icon of the Myaamia Center at Miami University

cecaahkwa kiilhswa is the third lunar month of the Myaamia lunar calendar.  Like the other months named for birds, cecaahkwa kiilhswa is associated with the process of transition from pipoonwi (winter) into niipinwi (summer).  The month is named for cecaahkwa (Sandhill Crane – grus canadensis).

cecaahkwa

cecaahkwa (Sandhill Crane) performing a mating dance

Around this time of year, Sandhill Cranes return from their winter nesting grounds in what is today the state of Florida.  Historically, some cranes nested in our traditional homelands along the Wabash River Valley and some traveled to other nesting grounds throughout the midwest. This moon marks an important moment of return, rebirth, and renewal for an animal, cecaahkwa, that is closely associated with Myaamia people.  Delaware and Iroqouis speaking peoples, who originally lived to our east and south, referred to the Myaamia as the “Twigh Twee” after the call of the Sandhill Crane.

Peace 3

Signature of Myaamia leader on Great Peace of 1701

In the past, Myaamia people would mark the edges of our lands by blazing the head of cecaahkwa into trees along major trails.  In 1701, a Myaamia leader signed a treaty with this very symbol.  Cecaahkwa remains a powerful symbol of Myaamia people and can still be found on the tribal seal of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma.

Seal of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma

Seal of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma

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