meekaalitiiyankwiki mihši-maalhsa – mikaalitioni kiihkayonki
The Mihši-maalhsa Wars – Part II – The Battle of Kiihkayonki

This article is the second of a five-part series on the history of our wars with the Mihši-maalhsaki (Americans), which occurred from 1778-1794 and from 1812-1814.  This second article focuses on the Battle of Kiihkayonki, also known as Harmar’s Defeat. If you want to hear the pronunciation of the Myaamia terms in this article, please visit our online dictionary at: www.myaamiadicitonary.org

In Part I of this series we looked at some of reasons behind the increased violence between Myaamia people and the Mihši-maalhsa (Americans) in the 1780s.  When we left off, the Americans were desperately trying to assert the legitimacy of their claims to the Ohio River Valley in the Treaties of Ft. Stanwix (1784), Ft. McIntosh (1785), and Ft. Finney (1786).  However, these treaties were largely viewed as fraudulent by Native peoples living along the Kaanseenseepiiwi (Ohio River), Taawaawa Siipiiwi (Maumee River), and Waapaahšiki Siipiiwi (Wabash River).

Following the defeat of La Balme (see last article), the Myaamia continued to raid American squatters along the Kaanseenseepiiwi (Ohio River).  In response, the Mihši-maalhsa organized many raids on Myaamia, Delaware, and Shawnee villages throughout the region.  This war of reprisals and retaliation forced Shawnee and Delaware villages to move ever farther north of the Kaanseenseepiiwi.  Eventually, they were invited to build villages along the Taawaawa Siipiiwi, mostly to the west of the two Myaamia villages, which had been located there for generations (see the map below).  The Myaamia village on the west bank of the Kociihsasiipi was the oldest and known by the name Kiihkayonki.  Its twin across the river was usually called Miamitown or Le Gris Town, after it’s leading chief.  However, because of the importance of Kiihkayonki, Myaamia people across time have tended to refer to the whole area around the confluence of the Taawaawa Siipiiwi as Kiihkayonki.[1]

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noonki šaayiipaawe tikawi neepanki (37) aahsanteeki. noonki kaahkiihkwe tikawi ceeliteeki (53) tikawi aalhkwahki.

tikawi_aalahkwahki

noonki peehkonteeki kiinte waawiyiisita kiilhswa (peemineeta).

kiinte_waawi2

taaniši kiišikatwi niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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noonki šaayiipaawe neepanki (18) aahsanteeki. noonki kaahkiihkwe tikawi neepanki (36) aahsanteeki. maayawi siihsipaahkahki ahsenaamiša.

aahsanteeki

noonki peehkonteeki naawi waawiyiisita kiilhswa (keešaakosita).

naawi waawi2

taaniši kiišikatwi niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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noonki šaayiipaawe neepanki (27) aahsanteeki. noonki kaahkiihkwe tikawi neepanki (34) tikawi aalahkwahki.

tikawi_aalahkwahki

noonki peehkonteeki waakhšinka kiilhswa (keešaakosita). kiinte saakiwa aanteekwa kiilhswa.

waakhšinka

taaniši kiišikatwi niiyaaha apiyani?

neemani-nko kati aakalaahšimaataweenki? toohkinanto mihtahkiši.
(For English, click below)

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aanteekwa kiilhswa is the second month of the Myaamia lunar calendar.  It is named for the American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos), which usually nests and breeds during this month. During the winter months, aanteekwa often gather in large groups but as the nesting period begins this behavior comes to an end.  In the midwest, aanteewka are some of the earliest birds to build nests and lay eggs.  Like the other lunar months named for birds, aanteekwa kiilhswa typically occurs during the transition from pipoowi (winter) into niipinwi (summer). Usually by the beginning of aanteekwa kiilhwa, maple sugaring is in full swing.

aanteekwa*

aanteekwa*

click here to return to the Myaamia Ecology page

*American Crow image from wikimedia commons

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